Corn and Black Bean Chili

Corn and Black Bean Chili

With the sudden drop in temperature and the start of football season, I have been craving chili.  I have made a ton of chili recipes, but wanted to create one that emphasized corn and black beans.  The combination of corn and black beans just intrigues me.  So I went through my spice cabinet and started grabbing spices. After a few changes, I got the flavor that I was craving.  This chili ended up being one the tastiest that I have made.  The addition of the corn kernels added a nice texture and flavor.  You have to try this chili.

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Eric’s Chili

Eric’s Chili

Eric's Chili

The other week Dana and I went up to DC to visit our Friends Eric and Laura. Both of us have infants so it was a chance to get out of the house and talk to some adults. For lunch Eric made this great chili that included black beans and corn. It was delicious. So I asked for the recipe and asked for permission to put it up on the web. I had to share it as it was delicious!

Eric’s Chili

In a large saute pan, add the meat along with salt, pepper and garlic. Start to brown the meat.

Brown the sausage and beef

About halfway through the browning process, add the onions, green peppers and jalapenos to the pan to sweat them out a bit.

Add the onions and peppers to the mixture

Once the meat is browned and the veggies are softened, add the mixture to a crock pot along with the diced tomatoes (juice and all), tomato paste, beans, corn, cumin, chili powder, and paprika.

Add the corn and beans

Then add the beer. Finally add the beef stock until the liquid just covers the mixture.

Add the spices

Give it a good mix and set it on low for 6-8 hours.

Add the liquid

Make sure to have some diced onions and jalapenos to top, as well as cheese and sour cream.

Awesome Chili

If you like it spicy, add about a 1/2 cup of Sriracha to the mix, but if you’re serving a crowd forgo this and just have it available to add individually.

Eric's Chili
Author: 
Recipe type: Chili
Cuisine: Southwestern
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
A great chili that includes beef, sausage, black beans and corn. Delicious!
Ingredients
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 pound hot pork sausage
  • Salt and pepper to season meat
  • 2 red onions, chopped
  • 2 green peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 jalapenos, seeded and chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons cumin
  • 3 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 12 ounces dark beer
  • 2 cans of diced tomatoes
  • 1 can of black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup of frozen or canned corn
  • 1 can beef broth, low sodium
Instructions
  1. In a large saute pan, add the meat along with salt, pepper and garlic. Start to brown the meat.
  2. About halfway through the browning process, add the onions, green peppers and jalapenos to the pan to sweat them out a bit.
  3. Once the meat is browned and the veggies are softened, add it all to a crock pot along with the diced tomatoes (juice and all), tomato paste, beans, corn, cumin, chili powder, and paprika.
  4. Then add the beer. Finally add the beef stock until the liquid just covers the mixture.
  5. Give it a good mix and set it on low for 6-8 hours.
  6. Make sure to have some diced onions and jalapenos to top, as well as cheese and sour cream.
Notes
If you like it spicy, I add about a ½ cup of Sriracha to the mix, but if you’re serving a crowd I usually forgo this and just have it available to add individually.

 

This is a great chili recipe.  Hopefully you get a chance to try.  If you do, let me know what you think?

Creamed Corn

Creamed Corn

There is no better side dish than corn.  I love corn!  So today I am making some homemade cream corn.  I love this with a nice sweet white and yellow corn.  Unfortunately, when I was trying this recipe out I was unable to get some fresh sweet corn.  The corn at the market was tiny and not sweet at all.  Fortunately, Mr. Birdseye had my back and invented a way to flash freeze corn so that I could have corn all year long.  This recipe works great with frozen corn.

Creamed Corn – (From the Neely’s)

  • 1 lb corn kernels, roughly 6-8 fresh cobs
  • 2 tbs sugar
  • 1 tbs all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cold water
  • 2 tbs bacon grease or shortening
  • 1 tbs butter
  • salt and pepper

If using fresh corn, cut the kernels from the cob using a pairing knife.  If using frozen corn, skip this step.

Add the corn to the cream mixture

In a large bowl combine the sugar, flour, salt, pepper, heavy cream and water.  Mix well.  Then add the corn kernels.

Melt the bacon grease or shortening

Pre-heat a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the shortening or bacon grease until it melts.

The corn mixture

Add the corn mixture.  Stir and then turn the heat down to medium/low.

Simmer over the medium/low heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture thickens and becomes creamy.  Roughly 30 minutes.

Check the thickness of the sauce

You can check the thickness by running a wooden spoon down the pan and seeing how quickly the liquid fills in the track.  As you can see from the photo, my creamed corn was ready to eat.

Creamed Corn

Right before serving, add the tablespoon of butter.  Pour into a serving bowl and enjoy!

Best Creamed Corn Recipe

This was awesome!  Make sure to taste your corn before making.  Then adjust the sweetness based on the sweetness of the corn.  Not all corn is the same.

Book Review – 25 Essential Techniques for Grilling


grilling

Every wednesday I review a cookbook to help weed out the good the bad and the ugly. This week I am reviewing 25 essential techniques for grilling by Ardie A. Davis. I love barbecuing and grilling and this book is right up my alley.

Ardie A. Davis

Ardie is an award winning expert with his own barbecue university. Artie founded the Greasehouse University. The degree program at the Greasehouse University is is a doctor of barbecue philosophy and is overseen by the Kasas City Barbecue Society. Artie is now a famed judge on the barbecue circuit. Story short, Ardie knows barbecue.Artie starts the book off like every good barbecue book going over the basics of smoking. He goes over the tools required, the methods needed and basics of starting to smoke. His essentials include the basics of choosing wood. As you know the wood gives the unique flavor of each dish. Ardie suggests wood for each meat and further goes on to suggest woods to stay away from. For instance, mesquite on chicken would be too bitter and alder on beef would be too mild. As a barbecue expert you may already know this and brush it off, but as a newbie, this information is awesome.At first look one would think that this book is a beginner picture book as it has a hard cover and does not have the the thickness of many other cookbooks. But this book is a great reference book for both experts and beginners. Ardie Davis covers everything from starting the grill to glazing the food after you take it off the fire. The recipes that are included in this book are great and are far from beginner.

Ardie start the book by listing the three main ways for flavoring grilled foods. Before grilling, during grilling and after grilling. Before you add seasoning and marinades. During grilling there is the carmelization of the sugars from the food itself. There is also the different flavors from the charcoal and wood. There is also the sweet, sour and spicy flavors from barbecue sauce. Lastly there are the flavors from after grilling from finishing sauces, butters and chutneys.

Ardie lists some of the tastiest recipes that I have read in a cookbook. My favorite is the grilled chickenwing drums with billy’s mumbo rub and sauce. This may be because I am fascinated with wings right now as I am preparing for the wingtacular, but the recipe and pictures look amazing. The sugary glaze produces a carmelized wing that without tasting sounds amazing.

The other recipe that amazes me is the dirty steak recipe. I have never heard of this before reading it in this book but you can grill a steak directly on the coals. Using basic seasoning the steaks are placed directly on the white hot coals and grilled for 2-3 minutes on each side. This method made famous by Ike Eisenhower and told by Ardie Davis is fascinating.

The third recipe that excited me was the lime and chile grilled corn on the cob two ways. Two ways you ask? Well you can grill corn shucked or unshucked. One produced great grill marks and the other gives you a more tender and moist product. Grilled corn is awesome. I have always pondered if you should grill corn with or without shucking it. Ardie solved my questions by saying that it is perfect to do it either way.

This book is awesome and answered many of the questions that I have had about grilling. This book is written excellently and the pictures are awesome. No matter if you are a just beginning to grill or have been grilling for 35 years, this book is for you. The book discusses the basics of grilling and further discusses recipes that even an experienced griller would love. This book is rather inexpensive and would be a great addition to any bookshelf.